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9 Recipes for Naturally “Dyeing” Easter Eggs (Slideshow)

9 Recipes for Naturally “Dyeing” Easter Eggs (Slideshow)


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Ditch the chemicals and go au-natural for your Easter eggs

Perfect Purple Easter Egg

Going Green Easter Egg

Cooked spinach can do more than power Popeye’s punches. For an all-natural green egg, combine spinach with vinegar and a hardboiled egg and you’ll have an earth colored Easter treat in no time

Click here for the Going Green Easter Egg Recipe

Carrot-top Yellow Easter Egg

Turmeric Golden Easter Eggs

Chili Powder Orange Eggs

Beautiful Blueberry Eggs

Red Onion Red Eggs

Beet Pink Eggs

Kool Aid Eggs

Entertaining expert Mark Addison dyes his eggs with a Kool (Aid) Twist!

“It’s a fun and easy way to utilize the bright colors Kool-Aid has to offer and it also smells great while you’re dyeing your eggs!” says Addison. “You can also mix the different flavors in order to come up with new colors. For example: Lemonade and Berry Blue will give you a green.”

Click here for the Kool Aid Eggs Recipe


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA's approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.


Watch the video: #ChemKnitsDyeAlong - Lets Kick Off the Sock Blank Special 2!


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