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How to Make Sriracha at Home

How to Make Sriracha at Home


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Have you ever wondered how to make your own Sriracha at home? If you haven't heard of Sriracha — also affectionately known to some people as "rooster sauce" — and love hot sauce, you're in for a treat.

Click here to see the How to Make Sriracha at Home Slideshow

The sauce, invented by Los Angeles-based Huy Fong Foods, has become an obsession for people. Initially popular within the Vietnamese (and also Thai) community, the sauce is now the subject of every creative cook's whims. True, Vietnamese food just wouldn't be the same without a bottle of Sriracha at the ready. Whether one is contentedly slurping away at a hot steaming bowl of phỏ, mixing up a bowl of bún vermicelli salad with some flavored fish sauce, or chomping away at a bánh mì sandwich, Sriracha is the condiment that, like hoisin, makes the eating experience complete for many people.

But these days, Sriracha can be found far outside the domain of Vietnamese cooking, and Southeast Asian cooking in general. People are crazy about Sriracha — slathering it on pizza slices, using it to spice up marinara sauce, and even making lollipops — and they are coming up with new and creative ways to use it all the time.

Why not take it one step further, then? Why not make your own Sriracha at home? We teamed up with Jolene "Jojo" Collins, proprietor of Brooklyn, N.Y.-based Love of Jojo, Inc., who makes artisanal Sriracha from organic ingredients, to get invaluable tips on how to make it from scratch. Collins says she began to make Sriracha when she decided to remove refined sugar from her diet for a month. "My beloved condiment had sugar in it, so I started making my own," she says. Understandably, she wasn't willing to part with her recipe due to its proprietary nature, but she offers enough advice to get readers started.

And just in case you don't want to ferment your own chile peppers — an important part of the process that adds complexity of flavor but also means a fair amount of extra work (and waiting) — we tapped Jonathon Sawyer, chef and owner of The Greenhouse Tavern and Noodlecat in Cleveland for his Power Ketchup Recipe, which can be whipped up from store-bought pantry ingredients in a flash.

Will Budiaman is the Recipe Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @WillBudiaman.


How to Make Sriracha from Scratch

Setting out to recreate Huy Fong's ubiquitous rooster sauce, I ended up with something that hit the right notes but had a brighter, fresher flavor that makes homemade Sriracha something special.

Brief History of the Bottle

First off: The sriracha in the green-topped rooster bottle we all know and love is not, in fact, an Asian product. True sriracha is a Thai sauce named after the city of Si Racha where it hails from and is used mainly as a sauce for seafood. It tends to be thinner, less spicy, and sweeter than the Huy Fong brand rooster sauce that commands the U.S. market. Over in Vietnam, it's more frequently seen as a condiment for bowls of pho or other soups and sauces.

So what's up with the emblematic rooster? It's the astrological sign of the brand's creator, David Tran. Originally from Vietnam, he started honing his hot sauce-making skills there before immigrating to the the United States aboard the freighter Huy Fong—which became the namesake of his company.

In the early 1980s, David Tran, with his industrious American spirit, set off to make a hot sauce that would satisfy the cravings of nostalgic Vietnamese immigrants who wanted the right complement to their bowls of pho. So was born the Sriracha that would eventually hold the patriotic ranks of ketchup and mustard.

The green-capped bottle includes ingredients in five different languages, and proudly states it's good for everything from soups to pizza to hot dog and hamburgers. I wholeheartedly agree with this statement, which is why I was pleased to take on the homemade Sriracha challenge.

Fresno vs. Red Jalapeños Peppers

There are many variables to test with this Sriracha recipe. I knew I wanted red jalapeños—the fully vine ripened peppers used by Huy Fong as the base of Sriracha. Little did I know how incredibly frustrating it would be to find them. A full-on red jalapeño hunt ensued across New York City, only to end weeks later in failure. So I came up with a Plan B: to find its closest cousin, the fresno.

The fresno is fairly similar to a red jalapeno, with a comparable size, flavor, and heat, but it has much thinner walls by comparison and a more conical shape. Once I opened up my pepper search to this second variety, I found tons of fresnos at Whole Foods I promptly loaded up with five pounds' worth.

I split that batch of fresnos into four different recipes, but never gave up hope on the red jalapeño. Another few days (and about ten to fifteen shopping excursions later), there they were, a hot red beacon of success. I went through all of the red jalapeños, taking my pick of the litter, and returned home triumphant and happy to start an entire second batch of recipes using the proper pepper this time around.

Fermentation, aka The Long, Long Wait for Sriracha

I took some fermentation pointers from the sriracha recipe in The Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens.

The process starts with pureeing the chilies with garlic, salt, and sugar, then transferring that mixture into jars and waiting patiently. This is when I started testing some variables.

With 3⁄4 pound of chilies, I tried varying amounts and types of sugar—palm, light brown, and white—and the same with garlic—raw versus blanched.

Each day I checked on my jars to mark their progress, finally seeing some signs of life on the third day. Sriracha jar #3 started to have little bubbles around the bottom, the first signs of fermentation. Within two days, three of the first four bottles seemed to fully ferment.

During the fermentation process, I unscrewed the lids to release some pressure and give the chilies a little stir. While the three jars were done at around the same point—five days—the last jar from that batch took an extra two days to start fermenting, then an extra day to complete.

How to Make (and Not Make) Sriracha

After fermentation was complete, I looked again to Randy Clemens' recipe, where the fermented chilies are boiled with vinegar, pureed again, then strained.

On first try this produced a sauce that tasted pretty good but much thinner than what comes out of the rooster bottle. The second time, I let the chilies puree for longer, then put some extra muscle into straining to extract more pulp, but the sauce was still too thin.

Switching things up, I first pureed the chilies with vinegar until the mixture was as smooth as can be, strained that into a small saucepan, and boiled it down until it had that lightly thickened consistency of the real stuff—success!

I repeated this again and again over a few days, letting each batch of chilies ferment at its own pace. Finally, after nearly a month of research, I had six jars of Sriracha samples.

Decoding Sriracha

Using a new set of tasting spoons (a Christmas gift from my wife—thanks, dear!), I went back and forth between the samples and the real Sriracha bottle, noting observations for each.

First off, none of my from-scratch samples tasted exactly like the bottled Sriracha. All of mine had a brighter, fresher flavor compared to Huy Fong's, which has an earthier undertone I couldn't match. The homemade stuff wasn't bad, just different. That being said, there were some discernible similarities that helped me get to the final recipe.

  • Chilies: Red jalapeños. I had no doubt this would be the pepper for the job, and it was. The jalapeño really delivered on the right flavor more so than the fresnos, which were hotter and brighter-tasting. Also, snipping off just the stem but leaving the rest of the green tops in place resulted in a flavor that was closer to the bottled version. Letting the peppers sit longer after fermentation seemed to make no difference.
  • Garlic: While the blanched garlic had a smoother taste, it was the larger chunks of raw garlic that packed the garlic bite you want in Sriracha.
  • Sugar: This was the hardest to discern of all the variables, but the palm sugar seemed a little weaker in flavor and sweetness, while brown sugar added more depth with its heavier hit of molasses. This is what edged out the others in the sugar department, so that's what I put in the final recipe (though you won't go wrong with palm or white sugar here).

Is It Worth Making from Scratch?

Weeks of work for only about four cups of hot sauce—was it all worth it?

If I had ended up with an exact replica, I'd probably say no, but the devil is in the details. The final Sriracha recipe has a similar balance of flavors overall, but with a fresher taste. There are times I'd definitely prefer this homemade version.

Plus, you can vary ingredients to play up your favorite aspects of the sauce. For a mellower garlic, try blanching it first. Like it spicier? Use fresnos. Want a thinner or thicker sauce? Boil it for more or less time.

So hats off to David Tran for making a sauce that has become so ingrained in our culture that it has left you reading a way-too-long post about trying to re-create Sriracha at home. Think you'll attempt it?


How to Make Your Own Sriracha

Are you ready to take your Sriracha obsession to the next level? Follow the simple step-by-step instructions in this video to whip up your own homemade sauce. Then check out these five healthy, creative ways to use it𠅏rom a honey-chile-ginger grilled chicken salad to a frozen Bloody Mary. And feel free to go heavy on the spicy stuff.

Honey-Chile-Ginger Grilled Chicken and Peach Salad

2 Tbsp. honey
1 (1-inch) piece peeled fresh ginger, grated
⅓ cup Sriracha
2 Tbsp. canola oil or olive oil
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast
Cooking spray
¼ tsp. kosher salt
3 ears shucked corn, broken into small pieces
3 ripe peaches, quartered and pitted (about 1¼ pounds)
8 ounces watercress

1. Combine honey and next 3 ingredients (through oil) in a medium bowl.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breast pieces between 2 sheets of wax paper or plastic wrap until very thin transfer to a medium dish. Spoon 2-3 tablespoons of chile dressing over the chicken coat well.

3. Heat a grill pan, grill, or broiler. Lightly coat grill pan, if using, with cooking spray. Sprinkle chicken with salt grill until cooked through (2-3 minutes per side). Transfer chicken to a cutting board. Continue until all of the chicken is cooked, coating grill with cooking spray as needed.

4. Grill corn until tender (about 5 minutes), brushing lightly with chile dressing while grilling transfer to a large platter. Grill the peach quarters, just until grill marks appear (about 1 minute per side), brushing lightly with chile dressing while grilling and coating grill as needed transfer to the platter.

5. Scatter the watercress over the platter. Slice the chicken into smaller pieces transfer to the platter. Combine cooked juices and remaining chile dressing stir well. Drizzle over salad as desired serve.

Grilled Salmon Club

1½ pounds salmon fillet, with skin
1½ tsp. toasted sesame oil
Salt and pepper
½ tsp. sesame seeds
8 slices 7-grain sandwich bread
1½ Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup mayonnaise
1½ tsp. Sriracha
1 tsp. lemon juice
2 large tomatoes, thinly sliced
¼ cup bread-and-butter pickle slices
2 cups baby arugula

1. When you buy salmon, ask fishmonger to remove skin and package it up for you. Cut salmon flesh into 4 pieces and rub with ½ tsp. sesame oil. Season with salt and pepper. Let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes.

2. Preheat oven to 400ଏ. Line a small baking sheet with foil and lightly grease foil. Place salmon skin scale-side up in a single layer on baking sheet (cut in half to fit, if needed) rub with ½ tsp. sesame oil. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and season with a pinch of salt. Roast until skin is crispy and golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer salmon skin to a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Cut crosswise into baconlike strips.

3. Preheat broiler. Brush bread with olive oil broil until lightly browned, 45 to 60 seconds per side. In a bowl, mix mayonnaise with Sriracha, lemon juice and remaining sesame oil.

4. Preheat a grill pan over medium-high heat. Grill salmon, turning once, until just cooked through, 5 to 6 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and pat dry.

5. Arrange bread on a cutting board and spread with Sriracha mayonnaise. On 4 slices, arrange tomatoes, pickles, salmon, arugula and salmon-skin bacon. Close sandwiches and serve right away.

Spicy Avocado Banh Mi

1 cup rice wine vinegar
½ cup sugar
¾ tsp. salt
1 carrot, peeled and julienned
½ pound peeled and julienned daikon radish
2 tsp. Sriracha
3 Tbsp. reduced-fat olive-oil mayonnaise
1 avocado, peeled
1 (8-ounce) baguette, toasted
1 jalapeño, sliced
1 cup cilantro leaves

Combine vinegar, sugar, and salt in saucepan bring to boil over medium-high heat. Stir to dissolve sugar (1 minute) let stand until cool (20� minutes). Add carrot and radish. Let stand until vegetables pickle (15 minutes) strain and discard liquid. In bowl, mix Sriracha and mayonnaise. Slice half of avocado set aside. Spread rest of avocado on half of toasted baguette. On remaining half baguette, spread mayo mixture. Fill sandwich with avocado slices, pickled vegetables, sliced jalapeño, and cilantro leaves. Cut into 3 pieces.

Chicken Satay With Spicy Peanut Sauce

1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast tenders (about 15 pieces)
4 Tbsp. fresh lime juice, divided
¼ cup low-sodium soy sauce, divided
1 Tbsp. curry powder
3 Tbsp. creamy peanut butter
1 tsp. minced peeled fresh ginger
1 Tbsp. minced fresh garlic
1 tsp. Sriracha
15 (12-inch) wooden skewers, presoaked
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro

1. Place chicken, 3 tablespoons lime juice, 2 tablespoons soy sauce, and curry powder in a zip-top bag. Seal bag and refrigerate 1 hour.

2. Whisk together remaining lime juice and soy sauce with peanut butter and next 3 ingredients. Set aside.

3. Arrange rack in the center of the oven and preheat broiler to high.

4. Remove chicken from marinade discard marinade. Thread chicken on skewers arrange on baking sheet.

5. Broil chicken 4𠄵 minutes, until cooked through. Sprinkle with cilantro serve with dipping sauce.


How to make sriracha

Today most Americans and Europeans seem to measure sriracha using Huy Fung brand as their benchmark. Made and sold by a Vietnamese-American genius named David Tran, this green-topped hot sauce has earned its place alongside the likes of ketchup as a condiment mainstay. Stylistically, however, it differs from Thai sriracha.

The sriracha recipe at the end of this post is Thai, so if you’re looking to replicate the Huy Fung sauce my recipe won’t get you there. Thai sri racha is sweeter, less garlicky, more balanced in acidity, and thinner in consistency. Both are excellent. If you don’t feel like making my recipe, you can buy a bottle of Thai sriracha in order to appreciate the differences.

Sriracha, pronounced see-raa-chaa in Thai, is the name of a seaside town in Chonburi province in Thailand. The most widely accepted narrative holds sriracha was originally produced by a woman from this town, named Thanom Chakkapak, as a sauce for seafood. There is no protected designation of origin quality scheme in place to protect the name, and so it has become genericised. Tran didn’t trademark the word in the US either. Consequently there are now many brands of sriracha on supermarket shelves.

Sriracha is one of a thousand and one condiments in Thailand, used primarily as a dipping sauce but with uses in cooking as well. A common pairing is with kai jeow, a deep fried omelette (that is veganised in Thailand using yuba, or fong tauhu in Thai). You'll find it in some noodle dishes, such as in Thai suki sauce, and alongside rich grilled and fried foods. In your own practice use this sriracha recipe for whatever the hell you want, although I advise you avoid putting it in your eyes as I somehow manage to regularly do.


I dig wings as much as the next person, but I'm not the kind of guy that plans a dinner around a plate of butter-and-hot-sauce-bathed, deep-fried chicken parts. Or at least I didn't think I was—until I tried this recipe.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

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Easy Sriracha Recipe

As with any recipe, you can tailor this to your own palate to create your own version of the sauce. I know some folks like their hot sauce to counter balance the heat with a little more sugar and some like more of the vinegary tang. Go for it and customize all those balancing elements to your body&rsquos tolerance. Personally, I&rsquove added a touch (just a slight &ldquoDiane spicy style&rdquo touch) to my version for that extra little kick of heat.

Last but not least, please don&rsquot skimp out on any of the ingredients, especially the fish sauce. The fish sauce adds the savory, salty and umami depth to this recipe. With out the fish sauce, this chili hot sauce doesn&rsquot have the exciting umami layer of flavor that I can taste in the original Sriracha. For vegetarians, you can replace the fish sauce with a soy sauce.

All of the listed ingredients come together beautifully to harmonize the flavor and texture of this hot sauce and without them, I wouldn&rsquot dare call it &ldquoSriracha style&rdquo.

Hope this rocks your spicy hot sauce world!

Here&rsquos my personal recipe for Vietnamese Fish Sauce Dip and click here for all our popular Vietnamese Recipes that are sometimes traditional and definitely sometimes not.

Asparagus Bacon Spring Rolls Recipe Here.
Garlic Chicken Spring Rolls Recipe Here.
Bacon Lettuce Tomato Spring Rolls Recipe Here.
Turkey Avocado Spring Rolls Recipe Here.

This recipe was originally published in 2009 and re-published in 2019 with a new video. Watch how it&rsquos made!


Instructions

Prep: 20 minutes. Ferment: 5 days. Cook: 20 minutes.

1. Blitz the chillies, red peppers, garlic, sugar and salt in a blender, food processor or food chopper until you have a coarse paste.

2. Transfer the mixture to a glass bowl and cover with cling film (plastic wrap). Set aside at room temperature (not in the fridge) for about 2 days until it starts to ferment and bubbles appear.

3. Uncover and stir the mixture, then cover again with cling film. Repeat this once every 24 hours for 3 more days.

4. Pour the fermented mixture into a blender and blitz until smooth, then strain through a fine sieve, pushing it through with a spoon, into a small saucepan.

5. Add the nam pla and rice vinegar and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and let the sauce bubble away (not too gentle a simmer) for 10–15 minutes or until it reduces and thickens. Remove the pan from the heat and leave to cool.

6. Transfer to 350ml/12fl oz sterilized jar or bottles, then cover with a seal or screwtop lid. Store in a cool, dark place. After opening, it will stay fresh in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

– If you don’t have palm sugar, use soft light brown sugar or even granulated instead.


Ingredients Needed to Make Honey Sriracha Sauce

The most important ingredient in this sauce is the Sriracha. I prefer Huy Fung Foods Sriracha with the rooster on the bottle. Another brand that’s good is Flying Goose Sriracha with the goose on the bottle.

You also want to select a good quality honey. Preferably one that is fresh and in liquid form. Honey can get crystallized over time, which won’t work as well for this sauce.

So, the ingredients you need for this recipe are:


How to Make Sriracha from Scratch

Setting out to recreate Huy Fong's ubiquitous rooster sauce, I ended up with something that hit the right notes but had a brighter, fresher flavor that makes homemade Sriracha something special.

Brief History of the Bottle

First off: The sriracha in the green-topped rooster bottle we all know and love is not, in fact, an Asian product. True sriracha is a Thai sauce named after the city of Si Racha where it hails from and is used mainly as a sauce for seafood. It tends to be thinner, less spicy, and sweeter than the Huy Fong brand rooster sauce that commands the U.S. market. Over in Vietnam, it's more frequently seen as a condiment for bowls of pho or other soups and sauces.

So what's up with the emblematic rooster? It's the astrological sign of the brand's creator, David Tran. Originally from Vietnam, he started honing his hot sauce-making skills there before immigrating to the the United States aboard the freighter Huy Fong—which became the namesake of his company.

In the early 1980s, David Tran, with his industrious American spirit, set off to make a hot sauce that would satisfy the cravings of nostalgic Vietnamese immigrants who wanted the right complement to their bowls of pho. So was born the Sriracha that would eventually hold the patriotic ranks of ketchup and mustard.

The green-capped bottle includes ingredients in five different languages, and proudly states it's good for everything from soups to pizza to hot dog and hamburgers. I wholeheartedly agree with this statement, which is why I was pleased to take on the homemade Sriracha challenge.

Fresno vs. Red Jalapeños Peppers

There are many variables to test with this Sriracha recipe. I knew I wanted red jalapeños—the fully vine ripened peppers used by Huy Fong as the base of Sriracha. Little did I know how incredibly frustrating it would be to find them. A full-on red jalapeño hunt ensued across New York City, only to end weeks later in failure. So I came up with a Plan B: to find its closest cousin, the fresno.

The fresno is fairly similar to a red jalapeno, with a comparable size, flavor, and heat, but it has much thinner walls by comparison and a more conical shape. Once I opened up my pepper search to this second variety, I found tons of fresnos at Whole Foods I promptly loaded up with five pounds' worth.

I split that batch of fresnos into four different recipes, but never gave up hope on the red jalapeño. Another few days (and about ten to fifteen shopping excursions later), there they were, a hot red beacon of success. I went through all of the red jalapeños, taking my pick of the litter, and returned home triumphant and happy to start an entire second batch of recipes using the proper pepper this time around.

Fermentation, aka The Long, Long Wait for Sriracha

I took some fermentation pointers from the sriracha recipe in The Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens.

The process starts with pureeing the chilies with garlic, salt, and sugar, then transferring that mixture into jars and waiting patiently. This is when I started testing some variables.

With 3⁄4 pound of chilies, I tried varying amounts and types of sugar—palm, light brown, and white—and the same with garlic—raw versus blanched.

Each day I checked on my jars to mark their progress, finally seeing some signs of life on the third day. Sriracha jar #3 started to have little bubbles around the bottom, the first signs of fermentation. Within two days, three of the first four bottles seemed to fully ferment.

During the fermentation process, I unscrewed the lids to release some pressure and give the chilies a little stir. While the three jars were done at around the same point—five days—the last jar from that batch took an extra two days to start fermenting, then an extra day to complete.

How to Make (and Not Make) Sriracha

After fermentation was complete, I looked again to Randy Clemens' recipe, where the fermented chilies are boiled with vinegar, pureed again, then strained.

On first try this produced a sauce that tasted pretty good but much thinner than what comes out of the rooster bottle. The second time, I let the chilies puree for longer, then put some extra muscle into straining to extract more pulp, but the sauce was still too thin.

Switching things up, I first pureed the chilies with vinegar until the mixture was as smooth as can be, strained that into a small saucepan, and boiled it down until it had that lightly thickened consistency of the real stuff—success!

I repeated this again and again over a few days, letting each batch of chilies ferment at its own pace. Finally, after nearly a month of research, I had six jars of Sriracha samples.

Decoding Sriracha

Using a new set of tasting spoons (a Christmas gift from my wife—thanks, dear!), I went back and forth between the samples and the real Sriracha bottle, noting observations for each.

First off, none of my from-scratch samples tasted exactly like the bottled Sriracha. All of mine had a brighter, fresher flavor compared to Huy Fong's, which has an earthier undertone I couldn't match. The homemade stuff wasn't bad, just different. That being said, there were some discernible similarities that helped me get to the final recipe.

  • Chilies: Red jalapeños. I had no doubt this would be the pepper for the job, and it was. The jalapeño really delivered on the right flavor more so than the fresnos, which were hotter and brighter-tasting. Also, snipping off just the stem but leaving the rest of the green tops in place resulted in a flavor that was closer to the bottled version. Letting the peppers sit longer after fermentation seemed to make no difference.
  • Garlic: While the blanched garlic had a smoother taste, it was the larger chunks of raw garlic that packed the garlic bite you want in Sriracha.
  • Sugar: This was the hardest to discern of all the variables, but the palm sugar seemed a little weaker in flavor and sweetness, while brown sugar added more depth with its heavier hit of molasses. This is what edged out the others in the sugar department, so that's what I put in the final recipe (though you won't go wrong with palm or white sugar here).

Is It Worth Making from Scratch?

Weeks of work for only about four cups of hot sauce—was it all worth it?

If I had ended up with an exact replica, I'd probably say no, but the devil is in the details. The final Sriracha recipe has a similar balance of flavors overall, but with a fresher taste. There are times I'd definitely prefer this homemade version.

Plus, you can vary ingredients to play up your favorite aspects of the sauce. For a mellower garlic, try blanching it first. Like it spicier? Use fresnos. Want a thinner or thicker sauce? Boil it for more or less time.

So hats off to David Tran for making a sauce that has become so ingrained in our culture that it has left you reading a way-too-long post about trying to re-create Sriracha at home. Think you'll attempt it?


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